SAHELI MOTIANI   |  2019

CARDBOARD CATHEDRAL - PRECEDENT STUDY

Materiality and Assembly

Spring 2017

This project involved producing a set of drawings that showed the assembly and building process of the famous cathedral in New Zealand. This Cardboard Cathedral was designed by world renowned architect Shigeru Ban.

This axonometric drawing shows the joint that was used to connect the paper tubes to the shipping containers and the floor. The roof of the Cathedral pitches up at the back by 16ft higher than the front. To allow the length of the paper tubes to remain the same length the length of the joint is increased. The height of each semi-circular component increases by 0.8cm.

 This is a close up detail of the component that sits in between the joint that connects the shipping container and the paper tube. Due to the increase in height of the triangular roof, the angle also changes. The angle at the top in the front is 55 degrees and 70 degrees at the back. The angle at which the paper tube changes. This drawing depicts the two extreme 'slopes' at which the paper tube sits.

 This is a close up detail of the joint in elevation.

 This is a close up detail of the cap that sits inside the diameter of the paper tube. It sits 'airtight' and has 8 ventilation holes. It has a slit in the centre to allow the semi-circular metal piece to pass through.

 This drawing shows how the component attached to the paper tube sits inside the component attached to the shipping containers (in elevation)

 Close up detail of the screw.

 Close up detail of how the paper tubes are connected at the top of the structure. A metal ridge detail runs along the whole length, with a laminated veneer lumber raft sits on top of it.

 This drawing shows how the component attached to the paper tube sits inside the component attached to the shipping containers (in elevation)

 Close up detail of the screw.

 New Zealand is exposed to a high level of winds each year. Cardboard by itself would not be able to sustain the power of the wind. The structure hence has been enforced with laminated veneer lumber(LVL) rafters all throughout. This drawing shows one of the places it has been reinforced with LVL.

 This drawing shows how the component attached to the paper tube sits inside the component attached to the shipping containers (in elevation)

 Close up detail of the screw.

 The shipping containers are also reinforced with a brace to allow for a more stable structure. This axonometric drawing shows the brace structure that the shipping container sits on top of. This brace is then anchored on top of the 900mm concrete pad. Along with the 'A' shape of the building which provides the building with a low centre of mass, he concrete pad is reinforced with rafters that allow earthquake proofing, absorbing the shockwaves.

 This is a plan drawing showing how the shipping container sits on top of the brace. A layer of insulation is added, which based on speculation and observation acts as a layer of wall hiding the brace from the inside.